Holy Week… Tuesday

The huge crowd spread their cloaks on the road,
while some began to cut branches from the trees
and lay them along his path.

Matthew 21:8

I suppose it was easy to get caught up in the frenzy over Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, the faces of those around me vied for my attention. Though most were too busy to notice the small group of tourists who hurriedly walked among them, an occasional passer-by offered a smile. Others looked less-than-pleased when our presence slowed their frenetic pace. I couldn’t complain as I’ve sported the same facial expression when hurriedly making my way through the mall or grocery store. These Israeli’s who call Jerusalem home had no idea that they were such an important part of my time there.

I imagined Jesus looking out at the crowds who welcomed him so excitedly. Surely, they resembled our fellow pedestrians as we made our way through the city. Surely, they were as busy or as preoccupied as their modern-day counterparts. Still, they stopped to welcome Jesus and to cheer him on. Had they heard about his miracles? Had they heard about his inability to pass by a person in need? Were they simply thrilled that someone was bucking their Roman rulers or the stringent temple hierarchy?

Though our parish church is deserted this Holy Week and I have no palms to wave, I have many reasons to welcome Jesus into this day and into my life. Though I’ve heard about his miracles, it is Jesus’ inability to pass by any one of us and his love for all of us which draw me to him. Now, more than ever, I cherish Jesus’ company.

Loving God, thank you for this Jesus who continues to reveal your great love for us and who walks with us through today’s difficulties.

©2020 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Holy Week… Tuesday

The huge crowd spread their cloaks on the road,
while some began to cut branches from the trees
and lay them along his path.

Matthew 21:8

I suppose it was easy to get caught up in the frenzy over Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, the faces of those around me vied for my attention. Though most were too busy to notice the small group of tourists who hurriedly walked among them, an occasional passer-by offered a smile. Others looked less-than-pleased when our presence slowed their frenetic pace. I couldn’t complain. A friend I recently met at the grocery store pointed out that I sported a fairly sour facial expression when hurriedly making my way to a register. These Israeli’s who call Jerusalem home had no idea that they were a very important part of my time there.

I imagined Jesus looking out at the crowds who welcomed him with such excitement. Surely, they resembled our fellow pedestrians as we made our way through the city. Surely, they were as busy or preoccupied as their modern-day counterparts. Still, they stopped to welcome Jesus and to cheer him on. Had they heard about his miracles? Had they heard about his inability to pass by a person in need? Were they simply thrilled that someone was bucking their Roman rulers or the stringent temple hierarchy?

I have many reasons to welcome Jesus. Though I’ve heard about his miracles and his conflicts with the powers that be, it is Jesus’ inability to pass by any one of us which draws me to him.

Loving God, thank you for this Jesus who continues to reveal your great love for us.

©2018 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Tuesday of Holy Week

The huge crowd spread their cloaks on the road,
while some began to cut branches from the trees
and lay them along his path.

Matthew 21:8

I suppose it was easy to get caught up in the frenzy over Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, the faces of those around me vied for my attention. Though most were too busy to notice the small group of tourists who hurriedly walked among them, an occasional passer-by offered a smile. Others looked less-than-pleased when our presence slowed their frenetic pace. I couldn’t complain as I’ve sported the same facial expression when hurriedly making my way through the mall or grocery store. These Israeli’s who call Jerusalem home have no idea that they were a very important part of my time there.

I imagined Jesus looking out at the crowds who welcomed him with such excitement. Surely, they resembled our fellow pedestrians as we made our way through the city. Surely, they were as busy or preoccupied as their modern-day counterparts. Still, they stopped to welcome Jesus and to cheer him on. Had they heard about his miracles? Had they heard about his inability to pass by a person in need? Were they simply thrilled that someone was bucking their Roman rulers or the stringent temple hierarchy?

I have many reasons to welcome Jesus. Though I’ve heard about his miracles and his conflicts with the powers that be, it is Jesus’ inability to pass by anyone of us which draws me to him.

Loving God, thank you for this Jesus who continues to reveal your great love for us.

©2017 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

An Oasis of Peace

“This is how you are to pray.”
Matthew 6:9

While in Israel, our guide lead us to several unexpected peaceful oases. One of these was the ancient city of Akko (Acre). Though the city dates back to biblical times, it is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site because it houses classic Crusader ruins both under and above ground. We walked through Crusader halls and streets which date from the 12th and 13th Centuries. The city which stands today is reminiscent of a typical fortified Ottoman town of the 18th and 19th Centuries.

Striking as these historical relics are, I found myself more taken by a tiny church resting in their shadows. The Church of St. Francis has been served for more than two decades by an Italian Franciscan priest. He ministers to a small band of parishioners who worship freely and peacefully in the midst of their larger Muslim community. Though the priest’s eyes glistened a bit when he shared the long years he’s been away from his homeland, his enthusiasm indicated that there is no place he would rather be. During this visit, I learned that Francis of Assisi visited Akko during Muslim rule. While there, Francis walked into a Muslim camp. Francis’ peaceful nature so moved their leader that the man allowed Francis to see all of the holy places from which Christians were banned at the time.

The priest who’d so warmly welcomed us gifted me with a holy card of St. Francis as I left. When I glanced at to see this tiny treasure, I found St. Francis’ prayer for peace on the back. What better message was there to take from this holy place where Muslims and Christians worshiped in peace in the heart of their Jewish country?

Loving God, make us all instruments of your peace.

©2017 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved