History’s Jesus

A family record of Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Abraham.
Matthew 1:1

As he guided us to and from sites in Israel, our guide’s other roles frequently emerged. Yossi is both an archaeologist and a professor of biblical religions. He is also an astute student of Israeli history and current events as well as of human nature. This became apparent when Yossi spoke of The Pilate Stone which was discovered in 1961. Archaeologists and historians agree that his small slab of limestone offers definitive proof that Pontius Pilate indeed existed and that he served as Roman Prefect. It was in this role that Pilate handed over Jesus to be crucified.

While making his commentary, Yossi added that there are some who continue to doubt the historical reality of Jesus. With that, he went into professor-mode to list secular sources which reference Jesus. The ancient historian Tacitus noted that Nero blamed Christians for the fire which destroyed Rome in 64 CE. Those Christians believed in “The Christ”. Another historian wrote that Pliny the Younger asked advice regarding how to deal with Christians since they included adults and children of both genders. In the Talmud, written by Jewish Rabbis between 70 and 200 CE, Jesus is referenced as a sorcerer among other things. Yossi maintained that these writers’ failure to endorse belief in Jesus promoted Christianity by proving in the secular arena that Jesus actually existed.

I’ve never considered the possibility that Jesus didn’t live among us. Though I realize there are people living on this earth who’ve never heard Jesus’ name, I’ve always considered Jesus’ life among us to be a given. Still, I wonder how evident this reality is in my life. Though I reference Jesus ad infinitum in my writing, do I reference Jesus in my living to that extent?

As I continue in my efforts to participate responsibly in our battle against COVID-19, I need to reflect the love Jesus taught me to share in all that I do.

Dear Jesus, thank you for your loving example.

©2020 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

A History Lesson

Remember not against us the iniquities of the past;
may your compassion quickly come to us…

From Psalm 79:8

A recent gathering reminded me of just how much I’ve forgotten. When a family member reminded me of a childhood incident which she thought had devastated me, I was hard-pressed to recall what had actually happened. Fortunately for me, I usually let these things go. The scar left by this particular injury faded into nothingness long ago.

I admit that there are a very few unpleasant memories which remain close to the surface. Though I never dwell on them, they do induce goosebumps or a queasy stomach if I give them the time of day. I never choose to think about these things. Still, a single word sometimes evokes memories which I cannot control. At times such as these, I take a deep breath and look upward. It helps to know that God knows my pain even better than I do.

We all add to our personal histories with every breath we take. This is no problem when joy accompanies those breaths. Unfortunately, the realities of this life include both good and bad events. It seems to me that the best we can do is to learn from them all. When someone or something hurts us, we try never to impose the same pain on others. When something brings us joy, we find ways to bring similar joy to those we have been given to love.

Loving God, thank you for walking with us as we make history with one another as best we can.

©2019 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Precious Lives

Return to God,
for God is gracious and merciful…

Joel 2:12-13

A dear friend recently reminisced about her lost brother. His parting three years ago had been painful for many reasons. These siblings had shared a troubled childhood, yet both their lives had taken a turn for the better before he passed. This change made their parting even more difficult than it might have been. As I wrote a note to console her, I stopped to listen to the voice of a newscaster which echoed from the television downstairs. He reported that a young boy had lost his life in a senseless shooting. This parting is painful as well. No parent should ever have to bury a child. The daily paper reported more of the same. No family should have to deal with these sorts of things. Passing naturally is one thing. Passing as a result of violence is something else entirely.

The God of Love knows full well that every life will end with a parting which pains other souls, yet God gives us life just the same. Short or long, each of our lives impacts this world in a unique and lasting way. Even Jesus was not spared the loss of others and the loss of his own life. Still, though Jesus knew full well what was in store, he came to live and to die as one of us. Yes, God values each of our lives and it is truly up to us to do the same.

Loving God, our losses bring to mind the fragility and the importance of every life. Help us to make the most of every day we are given.

©2019 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Our Post-Easter Efforts

Mary Magdalene and the other Mary
went away quickly from the tomb, fearful yet overjoyed,
and ran to announce the news to his disciples.
And behold, Jesus met them on their way…

Matthew 28:8-9

This Monday after Easter, we’re returning to our normal routines. Grandpa and I will babysit for our grandsons, our kids will return to work and the older grandchildren will return to school. Still, I’m taking a moment to consider all that has transpired in recent weeks. Lent was productive, though not always as I’d planned. My Holy Week observances were both sobering and uplifting as I returned to the scene at least mentally. I offered my presence to Jesus with the hope that I would have stayed with him if I had been there two millenniums ago. Today, just as spring offers hints of the beauty to come, I hope to hint at the Promise of Easter in all of my efforts.

When the two Marys went to Jesus’ tomb that first Easter morning, I wonder what they expected to find. I wish I’d been there when they arrived to find that the stone had been rolled away and that Jesus was gone. Did either Mary say, “I knew it! I just knew it! He rose as he said he would!”? Though I can’t be certain of their initial reactions, I do suspect that they responded with great joy when they saw Jesus once again!

As for me, I know what happened and I need to respond accordingly today and always!

Loving God, help me to make my life an ongoing hint at
the amazing things to come for us all.

©2019 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Jesus In History

A family record of Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Abraham.
Matthew 1:1

As he guided us to and from sites in Israel, our guide’s other roles frequently emerged. Yossi is both an archaeologist and a professor of biblical religions. He is also an astute student of Israeli history and current events as well as of human nature. This became apparent when we visited the Israeli Museum. Yossi led us to The Pilate Stone which was discovered in 1961. Archaeologists and historians agree that his small slab of limestone offers definitive proof that Pontius Pilate indeed existed and that he served as Roman Prefect. It was in this role that Pilate handed over Jesus to be crucified.

While making his commentary, Yossi added that there are some who continue to doubt the historical reality of Jesus. With that, he went into professor-mode to list secular sources which reference Jesus. The ancient historian Tacitus noted that Nero blamed Christians for the fire which destroyed Rome in 64 CE. Those Christians believed in “The Christ”. Another historian wrote that Pliny the Younger asked advice regarding how to deal with Christians since they included adults and children of both genders. In the Talmud, written by Jewish Rabbis between 70 and 200 CE, Jesus is referenced as a sorcerer among other things. Yossi maintained that these writers’ failure to endorse belief in Jesus actually promoted Christianity by proving in the secular arena that Jesus actually existed.

I’ve never considered the possibility that Jesus didn’t live among us. Though I realize there are people living on this earth who’ve never heard Jesus’ name, I’ve always considered Jesus life among us to be a given. Still, I wonder how evident this reality is in my life. Though I reference Jesus ad infinitum in my writing, do I reference Jesus in my living ad infinitum?

As I continue in my efforts to spend quality time with Jesus this Lent, I need to reflect this effort in all that I do.

Dear Jesus, thank you for your loving example.

©2018 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Food For Thought

God also said, “See, I give you every seed-bearing plant all over the earth
and every seed-bearing tree that has seed-bearing fruit on it to be your food.

Genesis 1:29

I’m closing in on two anniversaries today. It has been five years since a bout with the flu assaulted my appetite for a few days. This turn of events made a dent in ten pounds I knew that I should lose. When I returned to eating solid food, I considered my eating habits and eliminated the things that were better left on my plate. Within a few weeks, I actually lost those ten pounds. By summer, I’d lost a total of forty-two pounds which brought me to my teenage weight. Wow!

This amazing transformation remained intact for two years. It was October when I discovered I needed shoulder surgery. The recovery regimen would be tough and confining and I wouldn’t be able to exercise for some time. I secretly worried that this loss of control would negatively impact my diet as well. As it happened, my mobility was more limited than expected, my exercise regimen lay dormant for longer than expected and ten of those lost pounds made their way back to me.

My husband and I recently returned from an east coast cruise. This adventure included exhilarating walks uphill and down. When we returned home, I found myself with a treasure trove of memories and three less pounds to lose. Once again, I assessed my diet and adjusted as needed. Next October, I plan to celebrate three anniversaries: that bout with the flu, shoulder surgery and my return to using God’s gift of food wisely!

Dear God, be with me in this effort. When I feel my best, I do my best for you!

©2016 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved