Put Love First

Jesus said to him, “Rise, take up your mat and walk.”
Immediately the man became well, took up his mat, and walked.

John 5:8-9

Though this conviction took root when I was a child, I continue to be convinced that Jesus couldn’t resist a troubled soul. On the occasion cited above, Jesus assisted a man whose at least partial paralysis confined him to a mat which lay on the ground. Though the man somehow found his way to the healing waters of Bethesda, he could find no one to help him into the pool. Every time he seemed close, someone else went in before him. Jesus noted the poor man’s predicament and offered him far more than could be found in that pool. The man accepted Jesus’ gesture with absolute faith.

Jesus’ good deed drew the attention of the Pharisees because it occurred on the Sabbath. When Jesus cured the man and then instructed him to pick up his mat and walk, he violated the Sabbath by causing the man to work by carrying his mat. When the Pharisees saw the man do this, they chastised him. When they discovered that Jesus was responsible, the Pharisees began to plot against this troublemaker who seemed oblivious to The Law. Jesus responded to the Pharisees in kind, pointing out their error in placing The Law above the basic needs of one of God’s people.

I admit that my greatest frustration with the Church and organized religion in general is our propensity to confine God, God’s goodness and God’s blessings to our limited understanding. We issue edicts and attempt to enforce rules which sometimes get in the way of our service to one another. It seems to me that, when in doubt, the best we can do is to make love and the well-being of those we’ve been given to love our top priorities.

Patient God, thank you for our capacity to love. When we’re motivated by love, we always get things right.

©2018 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

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Rules That Matter

The arrival of a new baby quickly turns the lives of all concerned upside-down. Our newest grandchild offers proof positive in this regard. Fortunately, his parents and older brother have adapted quickly and all is well. Some changes aren’t as easy to negotiate. So often, our daily lives are complicated by a difficult diagnosis, an unexpected job loss or a loved ones tough times. I can’t imagine how those in the midst of the wildfires on the west coast and the storms and floods on the east coast have coped. At the same time, violence in neighborhoods across this country continues to upend lives just as brutally. All the while, many others struggle in the grip of difficult realities which have become their daily lot. Though there is much joy to be found throughout our earthly lives, persistent drudgery can be mercilessly discouraging. When I gaze at my new grandson, I can’t help tearing up because the human condition hasn’t evolved much over the centuries. As he sleeps peacefully in my arms, he gives me reason to do all I can to improve life in this world as best I can for him and for us all.

My conviction that things haven’t changed much since we humans took residence on this earth was underscored when my husband and I traveled to Israel. I imagined Jesus making his way through the crowds, sometimes alone, but most often in the company of his friends, curious onlookers and those seeking something beyond their sadness. In Capernaum, Magdala, Nazareth and Tabgha, I envisioned Jesus responding to the sick, the lonely and the downtrodden. Their suffering piqued Jesus’ compassion and his love. He did what he could to ease their pain. My little grandson and all of those whom I’ve been given to love do the same. Whether a family member, neighbor or stranger, I find it very difficult to walk away from his or her troubles. Yes, Jesus, I get it most of the time.

Jesus knew that none of us get it right all of the time. His most pressing concern was to love us and to teach us to love one another. Issues arose when those who should have done this best failed to prioritize love. Oddly, this should have been nothing new to the temple hierarchy who irritated Jesus most in this regard. In today’s reading from Deuteronomy (4:1-2, 6-8), we find Moses presenting the Ten Commandments to the people. They’d exhibited hard-heartedness repeatedly while they wandered in the desert and they desperately needed guidance regarding their relationships with one another and with God. In response, God inspired Moses to present the people with ten simple laws. These straightforward principles would guide them in loving God and in loving and caring for one another. The Pharisees knew this story well, yet they grew those ten commands into hundreds of precepts which oppressed the people rather than uplifting them. The second reading from James (1:17-18, 21-22, 27) indicates that this was an ongoing problem. This excerpt was written in response to some in the early church who attempted to put faith alone above their love and concern for one another.

In today’s gospel (Mark 7:1-8; 14-15; 21-23), Jesus made his point. The Pharisees once again criticized Jesus for not following the letter of the law regarding temple rituals. They were quite indignant over Jesus’ and his followers’ apparent disregard for these mandates. The disciples ate with ritually unclean hands. When he touched the sick and ostracized who were off-limits in the temple, Jesus himself became ritually unclean as well. Jesus responded to these accusations by pointing out to the Pharisees that they had allowed their devotion to ritual to replace their devotion to God and to God’s people. The Pharisees valued clean hands far more than they valued the people. They valued meticulous obedience to their precepts far more than the people’s heartfelt prayer. Though God had provided the Ten Commandments to guide the people in forming a loving community, the Pharisees separated them into the worthy and the unworthy, the clean and the unclean. So it was that Jesus enlightened them on the matter. Jesus knew that none of us is perfect. He also knew that we make up for our shortcomings in any situation with love. At times, this requires setting aside a rule or two so we can touch a heart just as Jesus would.

As I turn my eyes to my sleeping grandson, I admit that it’s easy to set aside my own agenda for this lovable little child. If only that was the case with everyone I meet along the way! Today, God asks each of us to do just that for all of God’s children, lovable and otherwise. Jesus put it quite simply to the Pharisees and to us all. God asks only that we do our best to be the best we can. When we fail, God asks that we forgive ourselves, forgive one another and get on with the business at hand. God knows better than we that sometimes our role in the business at hand is simply to walk away. That business, by the way, has nothing to do with tracking our failings or those of others. The business at hand has everything to do with loving one another as Jesus did and as only we can.

©2018 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Keep God In Mind

Hear, O Israel! The Lord is our God…
Therefore you shall love the Lord, your God,
with all your, with all your soul and with
all your mind. Take to heart these words…
Bind them at your wrist as a sign and
let them be as a pendant on your forehead.

From Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Today is Friday. While Catholics abstain from meat in observance of Lent, our Jewish sisters and brothers observe the Sabbath which begins at sundown. While in Israel, the rush of activity before Sabbath began was notable. Everyone hurried to get home to partake of their Shabbat Dinner. As we strolled along, we saw groups of Jewish worshipers garbed for the evening’s gathering.

Many of the men wore small cube-shaped leather cases on their foreheads. These little boxes were held in place with strings tied on the back of ones head. Before any of us could inquire regarding what we saw, our guide explained that these little boxes are Phylacteries. They hold small copies of passages from the Jewish Torah. These little boxes and a second one worn on the arm remind the wearer to keep God in mind and to keep the Law during their daily lives. Orthodox Jews wear Phylacteries in response to the passage from Deuteronomy which I cite above.

I smiled to myself as I listened. The author of Deuteronomy certainly understood human nature. How often we overlook God’s perspective on things! We become so distracted by our trials and tribulations that we forget to turn to the One who is at our sides in everything. I know that my worst moments occur in the midst of this very scenario.

This Lent, we need only turn to the life of Jesus for reminder after reminder of God’s presence in our lives. Jesus accomplished all that he did because he never lost sight of his Father. Even in the worst of circumstances, when I acknowledge God’s presence, I can do what needs to be done as well.

Loving God, thank you for remaining at our sides.

©2018 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Love First

Jesus said to him, “Rise, take up your mat and walk.”
Immediately the man became well, took up his mat, and walked.

John 5:8-9

The scriptures make it quite clear that Jesus couldn’t resist a troubled soul. On the occasion cited above, Jesus assisted a man confined to a mat on the ground. Though the man somehow found his way to the healing waters of Bethesda, he could find no one to help him into the pool. Every time he seemed close, someone else went in before him. Jesus noted the poor man’s predicament and offered him far more than could be found in the pool. The man accepted Jesus’ gesture with absolute faith.

Jesus’ good deed drew the attention of the Pharisees because it occurred on the Sabbath. When Jesus cured the man and then instructed him to pick up his mat and walk, he violated the Sabbath by causing the man to carry his mat. When the Pharisees saw the man doing this, they chastised him. When they discovered that Jesus was responsible, the Pharisees began to plot against this troublemaker who seemed oblivious of The Law. Jesus responded to the Pharisees in kind, pointing out their error in placing The Law above the basic needs of God’s people.

I admit that my greatest frustration with the Church and organized religion in general is our propensity to confine God, God’s goodness and God’s blessings to our limited understanding. When in doubt, it seems to me that the best we can do is to make love and the well-being of others our top priorities.

Patient God, thank you for our capacity to love. When we’re motivated by love, we always get things right.

©2016 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Love Matters

“Can the wedding guests mourn
as long as the bridegroom is with them?”

From Matthew 9:15

A few weeks ago, our four grandchildren visited with their parents in tow. We all enjoyed a wonderful time together. When I closed the door after the last of them left that evening, I realized that I have indeed turned into my mother. Though I normally make this observation during a moment of forgetfulness, that day it was made during a moment of great love. My mother’s favorite times were those spent with all of her children and grandchildren gathered around her. My mom found everything that she needed in the people she had been given to love.

When Jesus walked among us, he shared this appreciation of being among loved ones. This happened often since Jesus loved all of God’s people. Still, some complained that Jesus and his followers failed to fast and to follow other rituals set down in The Law. These observers felt that nothing trumped The Law, not even one of God’s children. Jesus replied that there would be plenty of time for fasting and ritual cleansing later. At the moment, walking with Jesus and absorbing all that he had to offer was the current priority. Jesus invites us to enjoy his company and one another’s as well. Though we will encounter many rules and regulations along the way, the most important of these is to love God and one another through it all.

Loving God, help us to see one another with your eyes and to love one another as you do. When in doubt, help us always to choose love first.

©2016 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved

Rules That Matter

The early arrival of our new grandson turned the lives of all concerned upside down. Fortunately, Daniel continues to thrive in his parents’ care. As I offer a prayer of thanksgiving, I acknowledge that life’s surprises should be nothing new to any of us. Every day, rules are made for good reason and rules are broken for good reason. In Daniel’s case, he arrived at God’s appointed time with no regard for the expectations of the rest of us. With that realization in mind, I look around at our untidy house, piles of laundry and the once-blank page which I am currently filling. I temporarily set these things aside because visiting Daniel and his parents at the hospital is a priority these days.

I admit that I felt smugly vindicated when I read the scriptures today. Mark’s gospel offers a favorite vignette of Jesus-the-Rule-Breaker. Jesus did not disregard The Law. His parents raised him to be a devout member of the temple who took God’s wishes to heart. Equally importantly, however, Jesus took God’s love to heart. It was this choice to care for God’s children above all else which caused Jesus to fall into the poor graces of the rule-makers of his day. All of this brings to mind a fictional portrayal of Jesus-the-Rebel whom I encountered years ago in The Joshua Books (which are a very good read!). These narratives chronicle the adventures of the contemporary Jesus of Nazareth who revisits our modern world. Father Joseph Girzone’s rendering of Joshua is very much in keeping with Jesus’ experience in Mark’s gospel (Mark 7:1-8; 14-15; 21-23). In JOSHUA IN THE HOLY LAND (Girzone, Joseph F., Macmillan Publishing, New York, 1992), Joshua finds himself in the midst of just such an encounter.

As Father Girzone tells it, it was early Saturday when Joshua walked through an Orthodox settlement. Joshua offended onlookers because he carried a backpack. This was considered “work” which was disallowed on the Sabbath. When Joshua hurried along, seemingly to attend to important business, his quick pace violated the Sabbath once again. Those whom Joshua passed expressed disdain over these violations. It mattered little to them that Joshua was on his way to assist someone who desperately needed him. Joshua pointed out that it was rigidity such as this which prevented his adversaries’ ancient counterparts from recognizing him. The men responded by attempting to do Joshua violence. Apparently, those men determined that violence was allowable on the Sabbath! It was only the unexpected intervention of a friend that saved Joshua from being beaten.

Passages from Deuteronomy and James join Father Girzone and Mark’s gospel in illustrating the intent and the spirit of the law handed down to us through the scriptures and tradition. In Deuteronomy 4:1-2, 6-8, Moses presents the Ten Commandments to the people who had exhibited their hard-heartedness repeatedly. They desperately needed guidance regarding the value of their humanity and their relationships with God. In response, God inspired Moses to present the people with these precepts which would guide them in loving and relying upon God and in loving and cherishing one another. James 1:17-18, 21-22, 27 celebrates the grace that comes in everything God offers from above, especially in the ten simple rules which draw the best of our humanity from within us.

Father Girzone’s Joshua reintroduced the same simple rules to the modern world. Joshua urged the people to consider their use of The Law and their willingness to put love above all else. This Joshua echoes Jesus’ challenge. When the unexpected disrupts our plans and turns our world topsy-turvy, we must adjust the demands we place upon others and ourselves. God asks only that we do our best in the moment at hand. If this requires setting aside a rule or two, so be it. The only thing we are asked not to set aside is our love for one another.

When our little grandson made his way into this world a bit early, his parents, doctors, nurses and the rest of us adjusted as needed to respond. When he arrived in need of a few extra weeks in the hospital, all else gave way to accommodate Daniel’s care. I admit that it is easy to set aside my own agenda for this lovable little child. Today, God asks each of us to do the same for all of God’s children –lovable and otherwise– when they need us most.

©2015 Mary Penich – All Rights Reserved